Travel, living and working in Guatemala - WorldSupporter Theme

Travel, living and working in Guatemala

Image

Guatemala, land of Maya people, mysterious traditions and amazing landscapes.

Tikal, the Mayan center, in the jungle full of howler monkeys, together with the very colorful Guatemalan population, is the main attraction. Antigua is the place where many Spanish courses are given and where it is pleasant to stay. Chichi has something magical, Flores, Livingston, Xela (Quetzaltenango) and Panajachel (with the famous Atitlán crater lake) complete the tour.

Table of content

  • Travel, living and working in Guatemala
  • Content and contributions by WorldSupporters related to Guatemala
  • Study Spanish in Guatemala
  • Staying safe en insured in Guatemala
  • Emigration and living abroad checklist

Guatemala

Image

Backpacking in Guatemala

  • Guatemala is often visited by backpackers as part of a longer Central/South America trip.
  • Characteristics: Mayans, many traveling nationalities, nature, taking care of safety.

Traveling in Guatemala

  • A trip through Guatemala is a journey through traditions of the Mayan culture, past and present. With high mountains and rainforest, in which a half-hidden Mayan city suddenly appears.
  • Spotting cities: Antigua, Chichicastenango, Quetzaltenango, Lago de Atitlan (Panajachel), Tikal
  •  nimal spotting: Guatemala is very high on the biodiversity rankings: jaguars, pumas, lizards, iguanas, turtles, crocodiles, toucans... and the extremely well-hidden Quetzal.

Study in Guatemala

  • Studies: in principle, all subjects and forms of education can be found. Studies such as archaeology, architecture, anthropology, biology, psychology and philosophy predominate.
  • Study cities: in Guatemala City you will find few - but good - public universities and several private educational institutions. Antigua is the city in Central America for Spanish language courses.
  • Characteristics: education is of increasingly better quality; many opportunities for studies of indigenous cultures.

Internship in Guatemala

  • Internships: Internships can be found in all sectors of society. The tourism sector has the most supply. Certainly also opportunities around biodiversity, welfare, agriculture, health care and education.
  • Internship cities: Guatemala City, Antigua, Quetzaltenango.
  • Characteristics: the work culture in general is also very 'mañana', slow down your pace and make sure you have learned Spanish beforehand.

Do volunteer work in Guatemala

  • Volunteer projects: especially in the social sectors and nature management.
  • Animal projects: protection of sea turtles, parrots, howler monkeys, jaguars, anti-poaching programs
  • Features: volunteer work possible from 1 or 2 weeks to several months.

Working in Guatemala

  • Jobs: temporary work can mainly be found in the catering and tourism sectors, such as at diving schools and in the travel sector. Also (limited) options in healthcare, call center and agriculture/nature conservation.
  • Characteristics: take into account the mañana work culture, ensure good basic knowledge of Spanish and be prepared to work for board and lodging.

Working as a digital nomad in Guatemala

  • Favorite cities: UNESCO top location Anitgua -of course-, with good co-working spaces and a growing digital nomad community. Lake Atitlan (including Panajachel) is a good 'escape' if you want to get away from the hustle and bustle of Antigua.
  • Features: take into account intermittent WiFi, frequently slow internet and varying 'value for money'. Digital nomad accommodation in particular can sometimes be more expensive than you would expect from this relatively cheap country.

Living in Guatemala

  • Language: Spanish is really the basis. English is spoken in the better known tourist towns and locations, especially in Antigua. In the smaller, remote villages in the high mountains you will encounter one of the many indigenous languages.
  • Features: You will certainly encounter the special Mayan atmosphere, enormous hospitality and mañana mentality. As long as you keep yourself informed of local safety warnings (and act on them!), you can live fine in the larger cities. It is pleasant to live in the better neighborhoods of Guatemala City if you work downtown. Cheaper than most other countries in Central America and better developed than, for example, Honduras or El Salvador.
 

SELECTED

Guatemala: content and contributions by WorldSupporters - Bundle

Guatemala: content and contributions by WorldSupporters - Bundle

Study Spanish in Guatemala

Study Spanish in Guatemala

Study Spanish @ Lago de Atitlán

Ofcourse, when travelling around in Guatemala and Central America, a basic knowledge of Spanish is 'a must' to connect with local Guatemaltecos. Guatemala has several hotspots if you decide to slow down and learn some Spanish -or improve your existing knowledge.

Main Study Locations

  • Antigua: thé study-Spanish-location in Guatemala, with a lot of larger and smaller language institutions. Pro: lot of options - lots of others students - relaxed smaller city. Con: lots of other students - bit more expensive.
  • Quetzaltenango ('Xela'): better option if you really want to connect with Guatemaltecos - bit less expensive than Antigua
  • San Pedro La Laguna: study Spanish at the Lago de Atitlan (!) - cheaper
  • Guatemala City: if you want to study in a more 'business' like environment - fewer young students (I studied Spanish at IGA)
  • Petén: study Spanish in the historical and environmental hotspot of Guatemala - combine with eco-volunteering

Must do's when studying Spanish in Guatemala

  • follow a sala class, cooking class (ceviche!) or cultural lecture
  • combine your language course with volunteering in one of many social or eco projects; Antigua, Quetzaltenango and Petén region have a lot to offer - take your time to really get into the details of your project and think about your competencies and possible added value before choosing a project
  • combine course locations: search for a language school with more than one location - start on a higher level on a new location

Share your experiences

Did you study Spanish in Guatemala?

  • At which location and language school? What experiences did you have?
  • What activities did you join after classes?

Read more

Comprar cosas 'shopping' in Guatemala
On your way to Guatemala: plan a stopover

On your way to Guatemala: plan a stopover

Iberia at Aurora airport, Guatemala

When travelling from e.g. Europe to Guatemala, you will probably not fly on a direct flight to GUA, Guatemala City.

  • Try to book a flight ticket that allows you to make a stopover in for example the USA (Atlanta, Dallas, Houston, Miami) or Mexico (Mexico-City).
  • Check your ticket conditions, maybe you'll have to choose a ticket that's a bit more expensive to allow a stopover for a few days
  • Great way to discover a bit more, before heading to the centre of the Maya's!

Photo By Vmzp85 - Own work, CC BY-SA 4.0

SPOTLIGHT

Study Spanish in Guatemala

Study Spanish in Guatemala

Study Spanish @ Lago de Atitlán

Ofcourse, when travelling around in Guatemala and Central America, a basic knowledge of Spanish is 'a must' to connect with local Guatemaltecos. Guatemala has several hotspots if you decide to slow down and learn some Spanish -or improve your existing knowledge.

Main Study Locations

  • Antigua: thé study-Spanish-location in Guatemala, with a lot of larger and smaller language institutions. Pro: lot of options - lots of others students - relaxed smaller city. Con: lots of other students - bit more expensive.
  • Quetzaltenango ('Xela'): better option if you really want to connect with Guatemaltecos - bit less expensive than Antigua
  • San Pedro La Laguna: study Spanish at the Lago de Atitlan (!) - cheaper
  • Guatemala City: if you want to study in a more 'business' like environment - fewer young students (I studied Spanish at IGA)
  • Petén: study Spanish in the historical and environmental hotspot of Guatemala - combine with eco-volunteering

Must do's when studying Spanish in Guatemala

  • follow a sala class, cooking class (ceviche!) or cultural lecture
  • combine your language course with volunteering in one of many social or eco projects; Antigua, Quetzaltenango and Petén region have a lot to offer - take your time to really get into the details of your project and think about your competencies and possible added value before choosing a project
  • combine course locations: search for a language school with more than one location - start on a higher level on a new location

Share your experiences

Did you study Spanish in Guatemala?

  • At which location and language school? What experiences did you have?
  • What activities did you join after classes?

Read more

SPOTLIGHT NL

Guatemala: blogs en bijdragen van WorldSupporters - Bundel

Guatemala: blogs en bijdragen van WorldSupporters - Bundel

Gap Year, Time out and Sabbatical - WorldSupporter Theme
On your way to Guatemala: plan a stopover

On your way to Guatemala: plan a stopover

Iberia at Aurora airport, Guatemala

When travelling from e.g. Europe to Guatemala, you will probably not fly on a direct flight to GUA, Guatemala City.

  • Try to book a flight ticket that allows you to make a stopover in for example the USA (Atlanta, Dallas, Houston, Miami) or Mexico (Mexico-City).
  • Check your ticket conditions, maybe you'll have to choose a ticket that's a bit more expensive to allow a stopover for a few days
  • Great way to discover a bit more, before heading to the centre of the Maya's!

Photo By Vmzp85 - Own work, CC BY-SA 4.0

Keeping up with Kerime Pt. 17 - volunteering in Quetzaltenang, Guatamala

Keeping up with Kerime Pt. 17 - volunteering in Quetzaltenang, Guatamala

Caras Alegres

Caras Alegres is a social/humanitarian project in the slums (Las Rosas) of Quetzaltenango, one of the biggest cities in Guatemala. The project has as goal to help better the life and education to the families, and especially the kids in these areas. Kids in this neighborhood live in extreme poverty and Caras Alegres gives them the opportunity to go to school, eat, play and be a real kid for some time. There is daycare and there are pre-school classes for kids up to age 6. The kids get fed and educated and are sometimes sponsored completely (kids are in contact with a donateur that buys them clothes, food and can later pay for education). The project also has a program for the women in the area, they learn sowing, knitting and therefor how to financially support their families. As a volunteer I thought in the Parvulos class (kids around the age of 5). I was an allround class-assistant, for there were 25 kids and only one teacher. I was especially helpful for the English classes but also for the very much needed hugs! Because I started at the beginning of the year the kids always saw me as their teacher and I could make a real connection with them.

 

¡Hola a todos!

Mijn eerste week bij  Caras Alegres zit er al weer op en ook ben ik gesetteld in mijn gastgezin en het Guatemalteekse leven. Het is super gezellig op de talenschool waarvandaan mijn gastgezin en vrijwilligerswerk zijn geregeld, ik ontmoet super leuke mensen en zie prachtige stukken van dit land, maar tegelijkertijd confronteert het werk op de school in de meest directe zin met de knagende armoede in dit land. Ik begin in deze blog met die gezelligheid en leuke ervaringen maar sluit af met een aantal van de vreselijke verhalen vanuit de school (hierbij alvast de waarschuwing dat sommige verhalen écht schrijnend zijn!).

Zondagmiddag maakte ik kennis met David, een student van de universiteit van Californië die hier een paar weken Spaans komt studeren. Hij verblijft ook bij Karla en dat is heel gezellig want hij is super aardig! Verder woont in hetzelfde appartementen complex als David en ik ook nog een andere studente bij een gastgezin, Michelle, een Amerikaanse medicijnstudente. En ook ben ik in de school heel gezellige andere reizigers tegengekomen, zoals Ella en Sarah, twee Canadees reizigsters en Hannah (nog) een Amerikaanse studente. Op maandag ging ik voor het eerst naar het project, ik reis daar met de bus heen samen met Ida, een Deense reizigster die daar ook werkt en in het hostel bij de talenschool woont. Maandag was echter vooral de opstart-dag omdat het de eerste dag van het schooljaar was, de "grote vakantie" is hier de hele maand december tot half januari. Maar die dag maakte we al wel kennis met onze klassen, Ida werkt met de groep van 3/4-jarige en ik werk met de 5/6-jarige. We blijven waarschijnlijk de hele periode met deze klassen, iedere ochtend van 9 tot 12, wat heel leuk is want dat geeft ons de mogelijkheid om de kinderen echt allemaal te leren kennen. In de middagen zullen we soms met de naschoolse activiteiten voor de oudere kinderen (7 tot 14 jaar) helpen.

De meeste middagen hebben we echter om door te brengen hier op de talenschool of om de te nemen aan de uitjes die vanaf hier worden georganiseerd. Zo zijn we woensdagmiddag bijvoorbeeld met de hele groep naar de warm water bronnen hier in de buurt gegaan, het water dat daar uit de vulkaan borrelt is heerlijk warm en schijnt ook nog eens genezende gaven te hebben! We hebben daar een paar uur heerlijk rond gedobberd en gekletst, iedereen genoot extra van het warme water omdat de douches hier meestal koud zijn. Toen het op dat onderwerp kwam vertelde Sarah en Ella ons dan ook vol trots dat zij wel warm water hebben, de rest reageerde daarop met een jaloerse: "You guys have hot water?! Luxery!". Maar toen het gesprek even later bij Hannah kwam en ze over haar gast familie vertelde: "They have these very bright lamps in the rooms" was het de beurt aan Ella en Sarah om jaloers te zijn: "Do you have a lamp?! Wow!".  Het is zo grappig dat onze standaard zo is veranderd dat we heel jaloers op iemand kunnen zijn die elektrisch licht in de slaapkamer heeft, een half jaar geleden had ik me daar echt niets bij voor kunnen stellen! 

Naast zulk soort uitjes zijn er ook activiteiten in de school zelf, zo is dinsdagavond filmavond en is er op vrijdag altijd een feestje voor de mensen die "afgestudeerd" zijn. De film van deze vrijdag was wel erg serieus, over de burgeroorlog hier in Guatemala, maar het is heel gezellig om zo veel groepsactiviteiten te doen. Ook het feestje op vrijdag was heel gezellig, met karaoke, heel veel snacks en zelfs een haardvuur. Met de sociale kant zit het hier dus wel goed, maar zoals aangekondigd waren er ook wat minder leuke, vooral hele zielige, momenten deze week...

De kinderen in onze klas wonen bijna allemaal in de buurt waar de school ook is, zone 5, bijgenaamd Las Rosas. Dit is bepaald geen villawijk maar een echt krottenwijk is het gelukkig ook nog niet. Aan de kinderen kun je soms echter wel zien dat ze het thuis niet bepaald breed hebben, hun kleding is bijvoorbeeld vaak heel vies en kapot. Maar als je hen over hun thuissituatie hoort vertellen wordt pas echt duidelijk onder wat voor omstandigheden ze groot worden. Zo is er bijvoorbeeld Raul, een vrolijke, ondeugende 4 jaar oud jongetje. Hij heeft een zusje van 1 jaar in de dagopvang en een oudere broer van een jaar of 7 die naar de middagactiviteiten gaat. Raul heeft een kaal plekje op zijn hoofd, maar omdat het nogal een brokkenmaker is zochten Ida en ik daar eerst niets achter, totdat een van de juffen ons vertelde hoe dat daar kwam. Raul was thuis met een stukje kauwgum aan het klooien en dat kwam in zijn haar terecht, maar omdat zijn ouders niet thuis waren kreeg hij het er niet uit en dus liet hij het maar zo. Later die middag viel hij echter in slaap, spelensmoe zoals zo veel kinderen van zijn leeftijd, maar al slapen is er een rat naar hem toe gekomen die het stuk kauwgum, samen met het haar, van zijn hoofd heeft geknaagd! 

Dit totale gebrek aan hygiëne in de huizen ging nog een stap verder bij Sandra, een 3-jarig meisje in Ida´s klas. Toen de kinderen op woensdag aan het buiten spelen waren viel het ons allebei op dat ze zo veel witte dingetjes in haar haar had, maar omdat ze net wat hadden gegeten dachten we dat dit wel broodkruimeltjes zouden zijn. Totdat Ida het van dichterbij bekeek en zag dat het luizeneitjes waren en dat ze de luizen werkelijk over Sandra´s hoofd kon zien lopen.  Nadat ze dat aan de juf had verteld werd die middag haar moeder ingelicht en wij verwachten dat er dus actie ondernomen zou worden, zoals natuurlijk onmiddellijk zou gebeuren als een kindje hier luizen had. Op donderdag was er echter nog niets veranderd en dus hebben Ida en ik die middag een luizenkam gekocht. Vrijdag heeft Ida wel een uur met Sandra voor zich op een krukje gezeten om zo veel mogelijk luizen weg te kammen. Sandra vond het ondertussen heel leuk dat ze zo veel aandacht kreeg, endat haar haar werd gekamd, want, zoals ze zelf vertelde; "Wij hebben thuis geen kam." Aan het einde van de kambeurt had Ida echter lang niet alle luizeneitjes te pakken gekregen. Dus ze vertelde Sandra dat ze shampoo nodig had en dat ze thuis al haar beddengoed moest wassen, waarop Sandra reageerde: "Ik heb geen bed...". Deze uitspraak raakte Ida en mij echt enorm, daar zat zo´n mooi, intelligent en nieuwsgierig meisje die net zo veel rechten en kansen zou moeten hebben als alle andere kinderen in de wereld, maar in plaats daarvan kon ze ´s nachts niet eens in een bed slapen en lag ze op de koude, harde vloer! Natuurlijk hadden deze mensen niets gedaan aan de luizen van hun kind, het was immers totaal geen prioriteit, eten en overleven zouden op zich al moeilijk genoeg zijn!

Toen ik die middag op weg naar huis was klonk het nummer "Another day in Paradise" van Phil Collins, dat toch al jaren op mijn Ipod staat, ineens heel anders. Daarom sluit ik deze blog weer eens af met een quote, in de hoop dat iedereen er af en toe eens bij stil staat hoe goed we het eigenlijk hebben: Do think twice cause it´s another day for you and me in paradise, just another day in paradise.

Besos en tot snel,

Kerime
 

Must Read: I, Rigoberta Menchú

Must Read: I, Rigoberta Menchú

Image

Rigoberta Menchú is een Guatemalteekse mensenrechtenactiviste. Ze is als Maya actief als voorvechtster voor de rechten van inheemse Guatemalteekse groepen.

  • In de regio waar Menchú geboren werd en in haar jeugd leefde, Quiché, leven vooral indianen, die grotendeels hun eigen cultuur en gebruiken hebben behouden.
  • De familie van Menchú bestond uit arme boeren; een aantal maanden per jaar werd de familie gedwongen om naar de kust te trekken om daar suikerriet te kappen.
  • Menchú en haar familie waren actief in verschillende oppositiebewegingen. De familie gaf aandacht aan burgerrechten en vrouwenrechten, in Guatemala controversiële onderwerpen. Haar vader, moeder en broer werden door de autoriteiten vermoord.
  • In 1982 vluchtte Rigoberta Menchú het land uit naar Mexico, en daarna naar Frankrijk. In beide landen legde ze de basis voor haar autobiografie, Yo, Rigoberta Menchú.
  • In haar biografie vertelt ze over de gruwelijkheden uit de Guatemalteekse burgeroorlog en brengt ze de genocide onder internationale aandacht. Daarnaast vertelt ze over de tradities, waarden en respect van de Indianen voor de aarde, mensen, familiebanden en vriendschappen versus de (brute) onderdrukking door een kleine groep machthebbers.
  • Menchú won in 1990 de UNESCO-prijs voor Vredeseducatie en in 1992 ontving ze, als jongste persoon ooit, de Nobelprijs voor de Vrede.
  • In 1999 verscheen er een nieuw boek over Rigoberta. Hierin werd aangetoond dat ze verschillende gebeurtenissen feitelijk niet meegemaakt of waargenomen kon hebben en dat diverse feiten uit haar autobiografie niet klopten. Desondanks vonden de verschrikkelijke gebeurtenissen die in het boek aan bod kwamen wél plaats.
  • Hoewel Menchú beschadigd raakte door de kritiek op haar biografie, is ze altijd blijven strijden voor gelijke mensenrechten en meer autonomie voor vrouwen.

Wil je je verdiepen in de achtergronden van Guatemala en de positie van de Maya-indianen, dan is Yo, Rigoberta Menchú een lezenswaardig boek.

Inguat, Instituto Guatemalteco de Turismo

Inguat, Instituto Guatemalteco de Turismo

Brings back good memories...

Foto van gebouw van Inguat, het Guatemalteeks instituut ter bevordering van toerisme (in de breedste zin). Tijdens mijn studietijd onderzoek gedaan naar een programma dat Guatemala op de kaart moest zetten als bestemming voor (rijke, Amerikaanse) gepensioneerden en renteniers. Wellicht onbewust heeft dat onderzoek aan de basis gestaan voor latere werk bij JoHo gericht op emigranten & lang-in-het-buitenland verblijvers!

Fantastisch stagebedrijf, erg prettige stagebestemming!

Comprar cosas 'shopping' in Guatemala

EXPLAINED

Travel insurances and insurances for long term abroad - WorldSupporter Theme
Emigration and living abroad checklist for legal and insurance matters

Emigration and living abroad checklist for legal and insurance matters

checklist legal matters

1. Make use of a legal advisor

  • A scan of your juridical status and the possible risks abroad may be advisable.
  • Check the consequences for inheritance tax, family law, succession rights and matrimonial properties.
  • Possibly get a review of your new international contract (mind the differences in labour law).
  • Check our blog 'How do you assess the reliability of an international insurer?' (in Dutch)

2. Look into the visa requirements & start the visa procedure

  • Expand the basic inventory that you made in the orientation phase.
  • Use online communities and forums, check recent experiences from people who requested the visa and have the same nationality as you do. Double check their advice.
  • Check for everyone if they need a work permit or residence permit, if they meet the requirements for that and which documents are necessary.
  • Some countries have extra requirements, such as medical clearances or police certificates.
  • Arrange a definitive contract or proof of employment with your future employer.
  • Contact the consulate or embassy before you emigrate and (double) check the current state of (visa) affairs.
  • Download all required documents and read the notices.
  • Plan way ahead, visa procedures can take long, up to several years (be flexible in purchasing/selling housing, finding temporary housing etc.).
  • Consider using a visa service company, especially for popular emigration countries.

3. Check which documents you need to legalize

  • Find out if your new country has a treaty with your native country.
  • Find out which documents need translation and into which language.
  • Find out which documents you need to legalize.
  • Provide birth certificates, marriage certificates, evidence of (special) (work) skills, diplomas, recommendation letters.
  • Start on time.

4. Check your insurance policies and ask for advice

  • Create an overview of your current policies, contract terms, contact information.
  • Ask about the consequences of your emigration with regards to current insurance policies and make sure that you terminate them in time.
  • Make sure that you terminate home insurances, property insurances, car insurances etc. at the correct time: not too early (not insured), not too late (double costs).
  • Read up on (international) health insurances. Find orientation on www.expatinsurances.org.
  • Get information from an insurance expert about:
    • Ending your current health insurance.
    • Whether your new country has treaties with your home country.
    • Whether to get local insurance or not.
    • Whether the insurance provided by your local employer provides enough coverage.
    • Getting international health insurance.
  • Start on time, mindful of  how long medical checks can take to complete.

4. How to prepare documents?

  • Check the validity of all passports. Or arrange passports for family members with a different kind of ID.
  • Also bring: passport photos, drivers licenses (possibly a temporary international driver's license), birth certificates, marriage certificates, last wills, documents on euthanasia, police certificates, divorce papers, death certificates (if your previous partner died), recommendation letters, diplomas, resume/CV, medical files, evidences of being creditworthy, school files, insurance papers, student ID's, medicine recipes and proof of the vaccinations you had.
  • Make an easy-to-find archive for every family member with (copies of) personal documents.
  • Make sure you know about recent developments concerning double nationalities and find out how to extend your passport in your new home country.
  • Consider using an online/digital safe or cloud functionality and give access to your lawyer or someone you trust.
  • Gather receipts of the properties you take with you (proof you own them already, to avoid breaking import laws).
Crossroads: activities, countries, competences, study fields and goals
Comments, Compliments & Kudos

Add new contribution

CAPTCHA
This question is for testing whether or not you are a human visitor and to prevent automated spam submissions.
Image CAPTCHA
Enter the characters shown in the image.
Follow the author: Travel Supporter
This content is used in bundle:

WorldSupporter: Theme pages for travel, living and working abroad in favorite countries - Bundle

Travel, living and working in Asia
Travel, living and working in China and Hong Kong - WorldSupporter Theme
Travel, living and working in Costa Rica - WorldSupporter Theme
Travel, living and working in Curacao - WorldSupporter Theme
Travel, living and working in Europe
Travel, living and working in Guatemala - WorldSupporter Theme

Travel, living and working in Guatemala - WorldSupporter Theme

Image

Guatemala, land of Maya people, mysterious traditions and amazing landscapes.

Tikal, the Mayan center, in the jungle full of howler monkeys, together with the very colorful Guatemalan population, is the main attraction. Antigua is the place where many Spanish courses are given and where it is pleasant to stay. Chichi has something magical, Flores, Livingston, Xela (Quetzaltenango) and

........Read more
Travel, living and working in India - WorldSupporter Theme
Travel, living and working in Spain - WorldSupporter Theme

Travel, living and working in Spain - WorldSupporter Theme

Image

Going to Spain for work, internship, volunteer project, study, travel, living or backpacking

With over 1600 kilometres of coast line and its outlying Balearic and Canary Islands, it shouldn’t come as a surprise that Spain is known for the sun-sea-party package holidays. But there is more. A lot more. From rich cultural heritage, beautiful architecture, an abundance of

........Read more
Travel, living and working in Thailand - WorldSupporter Theme

Travel, living and working in Thailand - WorldSupporter Theme

Image

Work, intern, volunteer, study, travel, live or backpack in Thailand

Thailand is a very popular holiday destination in Asia and has a lot to offer the traveler. Thailand is tropical, cultural, culinary and has history. In addition to the busy cities full of Buddhist temples, the wilderness is a home for special animals. You can choose to discover

........Read more
Travel, living and working in The Netherlands (Holland) - WorldSupporter Theme
Travel, living and working in The Philippines - WorldSupporter Theme

Travel, living and working in The Philippines - WorldSupporter Theme

philippines flag

The Philippines

The Philippines consists of 7,107 islands, of which only a part is inhabited. You will find many Bounty beaches and an amazing underwater world where you can snorkel with whale sharks, for example. Visit one of the small uninhabited islands and imagine yourself in paradise or climb one of the many volcanoes. The Philippines has great

........Read more
Travel, living and working in Vietnam - WorldSupporter Theme
Access level of this page
  • Public
  • WorldSupporters only
  • JoHo members
  • Private
Statistics
4583 1
Last updated
10-07-2024
Search